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Breaking News      Internet Tomb Raisers? Australian Discovers Saudi Arabian Treasures Via Google Earth
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07 February 2011

 
Internet Tomb Raisers? Australian Discovers Saudi Arabian Treasures Via Google Earth
 
Gone are the days of trekking through forbidden lands, machete
swinging through forests to uncover ancient antiquities. Today grab a
cup of coffee, warm up a scone as treasures it seems are easily found
via the internet.
 
So it seems according to David Kennedy, Professor, Classics and
Ancient History, University of Western Australia.  From sifting over
thousands of images his uncovered a wealth of historical sights of
immense importance, including 1082 stones carved into the shape of
teardrops all in Saudi Arabia.
 
Its a break though for many enthusiasts who struggle with resources
to fund expeditions, or find political barriers when trying to access
some nations.
 
That’s the challenge that was overcome by Kennedy.  Saudi Arabia
has forbidden access to many of it’s ancient sights and given the
history of tomb raisers, it’s no wonder that many governments are
hesitant thereby placing protections over their places of historical
significance.
 
Yet as now it seems the internet, through Google Earth can pin
point the location of ancient treasures.  So how will governments
respond, will they find it virtually impossible to stop the illegal
theft of antiquities now?

If you have any comments, or even a correction, on this
article please email Mary Banfield: info@cultureclashdaily.com

All (reasonable) comments will be uploaded onto this
site.

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References:

http://whttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/8303805/Google-Earth-finds-Saudi-Arabias-forbidden-archaeological-secrets.htmlww.nbcbayarea.com/news/tech/Google-Earth-Helps-Find-Ancient-Archaeological-Sites-115367024.html


 
 
Many thanks to Dave Kaiser for sending in the following comments:
 

I read your article on “teardrop” stones in Saudi Arabia.

I have just retired, after spending more than 25 years living in Saudi Arabia with my family.

Your
comments about Saudi Arabia restricting access to historical sites is
absurd! Saudi Arabia has numerous projects going on in which Saudi
nationals, who are also trained archaeologists are studying such sites.
Why should Saudi Arabia permit outsiders into its country to investigate
such sites.

The company I worked for for 16 years, Saudi Aramco
in Dhahran, documents such sites and historical information in its
publication, Aramco and Its World. Copies of this magazine are provided
to anyone who asks for them and archives are available online. This
magazine describes the history of Saudi Arabia over the last millenia
and at
the same time presents the most recent findings.

One of the big
drawbacks I encountered while living and traveling around Saudi Arabia
was the harsh weather and terrain conditions. I traveled to numerous
historical sites, often accompanied by a historian and translator and
wrote about many of these. Take a look at my website, link below, and
you will see some of these articles.

Prior to joining Aramco my
family and I also went to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 1977-2004 and also
viewed many historically significant sites there while I was editor of
Arab News, a daily English-language newspaper.

Your article
criticizes Saudi Arabia for not allowing foreign archaeologists int the
country — this is actually a good thing because it enables the country
to keep its archaeological sites pristine, unspoiled and undamaged! Look
what happened in Egypt thanks to allowing foreign archaeologists
access! There ARE many government-sponsored museums and
historical sites where we and anyone living in Saudi Arabia were able
to go and view wondrous artifacts.I read your article on “teardrop” stones in Saudi Arabia.

I have just retired, after spending more than 25 years living in Saudi Arabia with my family.

Your
comments about Saudi Arabia restricting access to historical sites is
absurd! Saudi Arabia has numerous projects going on in which Saudi
nationals, who are also trained archaeologists are studying such sites.
Why should Saudi Arabia permit outsiders into its country to investigate
such sites.

The company I worked for for 16 years, Saudi Aramco
in Dhahran, documents such sites and historical information in its
publication, Aramco and Its World. Copies of this magazine are provided
to anyone who asks for them and archives are available online. This
magazine describes the history of Saudi Arabia over the last millenia
and at
the same time presents the most recent findings.

One of the big
drawbacks I encountered while living and traveling around Saudi Arabia
was the harsh weather and terrain conditions. I traveled to numerous
historical sites, often accompanied by a historian and translator and
wrote about many of these. Take a look at my website, link below, and
you will see some of these articles.

Prior to joining Aramco my
family and I also went to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 1977-2004 and also
viewed many historically significant sites there while I was editor of
Arab News, a daily English-language newspaper.

Your article
criticizes Saudi Arabia for not allowing foreign archaeologists int the
country — this is actually a good thing because it enables the country
to keep its archaeological sites pristine, unspoiled and undamaged! Look
what happened in Egypt thanks to allowing foreign archaeologists
access! There ARE many government-sponsored museums and
historical sites where we and anyone living in Saudi Arabia were able
to go and view wondrous artifacts.

 
Dave Kaiser
Crystal River, FL 34428
www.FloridaPublishing.com

 
 
 
 

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